New Delhi–India’s Capital City:

This is our pleasure to welcome you to New Delhi and enjoy the golden ambiance of India. Our capital is situated in heart of India having beautiful culture, more than thousand languages and different customs spreading from Kashmir to Kanyakumari and Rajasthan to Arunachal Pradesh. With the “Grace of God” India is a country where all types of atmosphere, treasures, culture and tastes are available and we believe to respect all religion and relation.

National Capital Region covers a large area, totaling around 1,484 square kilometers. The city has a population density of 29,259.12 people per square mile and its population about 18.6 million (2016), which is one of the highest in the world. Prominent cities of NCR include Delhi, Gurgaon, Noida, Faridabad and Ghaziabad. The NCR is a rural-urban region, with a population of over 46,069,000 and an urbanization level of 62.6%. As well as the cities and towns the NCR contains ecologically sensitive areas like the Aravalli ridge, forests, wildlife and bird sanctuaries. The Delhi Extended Urban Agglomeration, a part of the NCR, contributed $370 billion or roughly 4% to the Indian economy (measured in terms of GDP PPP) in 2015-16. Our national language is Hindi, but English, Urdu, Sanskrit, Bengali alongwith 1652 other approved language we speak in India.

For the ease of delegates and companions, ICOLD2020 activities and accommodation will be in New Delhi which will have easy access to entertainment, shopping centres, open-air markets, recreation and culture. The Red Fort, Qutub Minar, National Museum, Gurudwara Bangla Sahib, Lotus Temple, India Gate, Jama Masjid, Humayun's Tomb, Akshardham, National Zoological Park, Gandhi Smriti and the Mahatma Gandhi Memorial, Jantar Mantar Observatory and National Crafts Museum are the attraction point for tourists.

Qutub Minar, Delhi

One of the tallest creations in the Indian history is the Qutub Minar. With its red sandstone and aesthetic Iranian architecture, the minaret is the most famous tourist attraction in India. This UNESCO World Heritage site towers at a height of 240 feet making it one of the tallest ancient towers across the globe. Assimilate history of the minaret by reading the inscriptions engraved in Parso-Arabic and Nagari characters. Built by Qutub Ud-Din-Aibak in the nineteenth century this tower is a must visit place in Delhi.

Red Fort

Built at the zenith of Mughal Empire by Shah Jahan, Lal Quila was completed in a period of nine years. The fort today stands as a testimony to the magnificent glory and power of Mughal Sultanate, adorned in walls of red sandstone. One of the most politically significant monument, the Red Fort witnesses the independence day celebrations every year. A fine blend of Persian and indigenous architectural styles, the Red Fort hosts important key rooms such, Diwan-i-aam, Diwan-i-Khas, Mumtaz Mahal, Rang Mahal among many others. Spending a pleasant autumn day around the lawns of this area would be the perfect way to walk through the history of Mughal India.

Lotus Temple

In the east of Nehru place, this temple is built in the shape of a lotus flower and is the last of seven Major Bahai's temples built around the world. Completed in1986 it is set among the lush green landscaped gardens. The structure is made up of pure white marble The architect Furiburz Sabha chose the lotus as the symbol common to Hinduism, Buddhism, Around the blooming petals there are nine pools of water, which light up, in natural light. It looks spectacular at dusk when it is flood lit.

Swaminarayan Akshardham Temple

Swaminarayan Akshardham in New Delhi epitomizes 10,000 years of Indian culture in all its breathtaking grandeur, beauty, wisdom an d bliss. It brilliantly showcases the essence of India’s ancient architecture, traditions and timeless spiritual messages. The Akshardham experience is an enlightening journey through India’s glorious art, values and contributions for the progress, happiness and harmony of mankind. The Swaminarayan Akshardham complex was built in only five years through the blessings of HDH Pramukh Swami Maharaj of the Bochasanwasi Shri Akshar Purushottam Swaminarayan Sanstha (BAPS) and the colossal devotional efforts of 11,000 artisans and thousands of BAPS volunteers. Heralded by the Guinness World Record as the World’s Largest Comprehensive Hindu Temple, the complex was inaugurated on 6 November, 2005.

India Gate

At the centre of New Delhi stands the 42 m high India Gate, an "Arc-de-Triomphe" like archway in the middle of a crossroad. Almost similar to its French counterpart, it commemorates the 70,000 Indian soldiers who lost their lives fighting for the British Army during the World War I. The memorial bears the names of more than 13,516 British and Indian soldiers killed in the Northwestern Frontier in the Afghan war of 1919. The entire arch stands on a low base of red Bharatpur stone and rises in stages to a huge moulding. The cornice is inscribed with the Imperial suns while both sides of the arch have INDIA, flanked by the dates MCMXIV (1914 left) and MCMXIX (1919 right). The shallow domed bowl at the top was intended to be filled with burning oil on anniversaries but this is rarely done. Surrounding the imposing structure is a large expanse of lush green lawns, which is a popular picnic spot. One can see hoards of people moving about the brightly lit area and on the lawns on summer evenings.

Humayun’s Tomb

Humayun is the tomb (Humayun ka Maqbara) was commissioned by Humayun's first wife and chief consort, Empress Bega Begum (also known as Haji Begum) in 1569-70, and designed by Mirak Mirza Ghiyas and his son, Sayyid Muhammad, Persian architects chosen by her. It was the first garden-tomb on the Indian subcontinent and is located in Nizamuddin East, Delhi, India. It was also the first structure to use red sandstone at such a scale. The tomb was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1993. It represented a leap in Mughal architecture, and together with its accomplished Charbagh garden, typical of Persian gardens, but never seen before in India. The site was chosen on the banks of Yamuna river, due to its proximity to Nizamuddin Dargah, the mausoleum of the celebrated Sufisaint of Delhi, Nizamuddin Auliya, who was much revered by the rulers of Delhi, and whose residence, Chilla Nizamuddin Auliya lies just north-east of the tomb. In later Mughal history, the last Mughal Emperor, Bahadur Shah Zafar took refuge here, during the Indian Rebellion of 1857, along with three princes, and was captured by Captain Hodson before being exiled to Rangoon.[10][22] At the time of the Slave Dynasty this land was under the 'KiloKheri Fort' which was capital of Sultan Kequbad, son of Nasiruddin (1268–1287).

Taj Mahal

The Taj Mahal meaning "Crown of the Palaces" is an ivory-white marble mausoleum on the south bank of the Yamuna river in the Indian city of Agra. It was commissioned in 1632 by the Mughal emperor, Shah Jahan (reigned from 1628 to 1658), to house the tomb of his favourite wife, Mumtaz Mahal. Construction of the mausoleum was essentially completed in 1643 at a cost estimated around 32 million rupees. The construction project employed some 20,000 artisans under the guidance of a board of architects led by the court architect to the emperor, Ustad Ahmad Lahauri. The Taj Mahal was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983 and it was declared a winner of the New7Wonders of the World (2000–2007) initiative.

Agra Fort

Agra Fort is a historical fort in the city of Agra in India and the Fort was built in the year 1573 under the reign of Akbar – one of the greatest Mughal Emperors. It took more than 4000 workers and eight years of hardship to complete the fort. Knowing the significance of its location, Akbar built the fort to make it the main residence of the Mughals. The fort houses numerous impressive structures like the Jahangir Mahal, Khas Mahal, Diwan-i-Khass, Diwan-i-Am, Machchhi Bhawan and Moti Masjid. Agra Fort is a UNESCO World Heritage site. Today, the fort is a major tourist spot and attracts many tourists from all over the world.

Hawa Mahal

Hawa Mahal is a five story building that is situated in the heart of the city of Jaipur. It was built in structured shape of Lord Krishna’s crown in the year 1799 for the woman of the royal palace. In medieval India a ‘pardah’ system was followed where the royal woman followed seclusion. In order for royal woman to be connected to the outside would the Hawa Mahal was built. The queens and princesses could look at the various processions and events through the many windows of the Hawa Mahal.

It has a beehive like structure and is made of red and pink sand stone lined with white color to make it vibrant. The palace has carved and arched small chhatris or dome-shaped pavilions showing the richness of vivid Rajputana architecture. The walls of palace have 953 jharokha or overhanging balconies from where cool and fresh air can pass. The most unique aspect about the palace is the fact that at all times a light breeze passes through it. That is how the palace got its name. Hawa means wind, which is the Palace of Winds.

Organized By

In Collaboration with

Hosted By

ICOLD 2020

Supported by
Ministry of Jal Shakti ,Department of Water Resources, River Development & Ganga Rejuvenation
&
Ministry of Power
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